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How The Coffee Grind Size Affects The Taste And Flavour Of Your Coffee

Updated: Jan 1

When making coffee, it is our aim to get the best flavors and tastes out of the coffee grinds. There is nothing worse than brewing bad coffee from excellent beans leaving a bitter (literally) taste in our mouths.


Many coffee drinkers get intimidated with the high sounding techniques and methodologies available on the internet for brewing a good cup of coffee.

On the contrary, once you have learnt what factors come in play with each other which affect the taste and flavors of your coffee grinds, brewing the perfect cup of coffee can be ‘joe’full experience.


Put your fears aside as we take you on a journey of mastering the science of brewing like an experienced Barista. The secret is simple…..

Start with good quality coffee beans that have been ground to the perfect size based on your brewing method. Every brewing technique demands a different grind size.

Unfortunately, many a wonderful coffee has been let down by its grind profile. From the wrong size to inconsistent grinds, there are many factors that can go wrong.

Brewing coffee is essentially drawing out the flavors and tastes of the compounds of the coffee bean as effectively as possible so that the original notes of the coffee bean can be extracted.


This extraction process is controlled by water:coffee ratio, brew time, water temperature and most importantly the grind size.The final coffee flavour will depend on how many compounds are extracted from those roasted beans into the brew.

So here’s the science-



The reason for grinding coffee beans is to increase the surface area of the grinds in contact with water during the extraction process.

A fine grind indicates that the grinds are packed in a tight space together and allow the water to pass through at a slower rate. This means the water comes in contact with the coffee grinds for a longer period of time resulting in over-extraction. This results in the brew to be bitter in taste.


A course grind indicates that the grinds are loosely packed and allow the water to pass through at a faster rate. This means the water comes in contact with the coffee grinds for a shorter period of time resulting in a weak, sour or under-extracted brew.

So how do you know what is the correct grind for you?

By selecting the correct grind size and consistency, you can start brewing better coffee every time..